NNETESOL Board Opportunities for 2016

14022210_1079749178761807_3098381108377639326_n (1)Would you like to be more involved with NNETESOL? Consider joining the board in the upcoming elections at our November 2016 Conference.
We’re looking for
  • a New Hampshire State Representative,
  • a Publishers’ Liaison,
  • a Veteran Member at Large,
  • and a Webmaster.
More information about position responsibilities may be found on our website. We’d love to have you.  If interested, please contact Anne Wright Shank, Past President, awrightshank@cssu.org.

Fall Conference Registration is Now Open!

14022210_1079749178761807_3098381108377639326_n (1)Hurray, we are open for business!

Participants and presenters, please register here.

Publishers, your registration site is here.

You can also look at a basic schedule for the day at this link.

Don’t forget to register before September 25th for early bird prices! Can’t wait to see you in Gorham on 11/5!

 

Professional Development at HAUniv

By Heather Wardwell, NNETESOL New Hampshire Member

Please join Hellenic American University for an open house to learn more about our innovative Executive MBA program and our new Teaching English as Second Language professional development programs. Hosted by Hellenic American University President Leonidas Koskos and with an overview by Steve Norton – Executive Director of the New Hampshire Center for Public Policy Studies. In addition, Marie Blanchard, from the NH DOE ESOL department, will be presenting on Title III in New Hampshire.

The sky’s the limit with HAUniv, so join us at the fabulous new “Penthouse in the Sky” above Manchester.
September 14, 2016
4 p.m. to 6 p.m.
The Penthouse in the Sky
555 Canal St, Manchester, NH

https://www.eventbrite.com/e/open-house-for-the-mba-and-tesol-programs-tickets-26965670045

Free Money. No Kidding.

by Beth Evans, NNETESOL Board President-Elect
dollar-1362244_960_720

Free money.
For teachers.
Really! I’m not kidding!

Happy waning days of summer, NNETESOLers! Now is the time that you need to start thinking about your hopes and dreams. As a member of the NNETESOL board, I’d like you to know that part of what you spend to come to our fall conference (which, by the way, is going to be in Gorham, Maine, this year) is going toward scholarships that support you.

We try very hard to keep our registration prices low and to bring in speakers with interesting ideas, who push you to think in new directions. We know that in our tri-state region, professional development may not be easy to come by. And we hope that by working together, we can learn from each other.
But we also want to support what you do every day. We understand how hard this job is, and we think you deserve some recognition.

So here’s what you need to know:

  • The deadline for all our grants is September 1. (And to be perfectly honest with you, we get very few applicants. The competition since I joined the board in 2006 has been weak at best. One, maybe two people apply each year for the grants. Sometimes we get none. We’d like to change that.)
  • You must live, work and/or study in the tri-state region we represent.
  • You must be an NNETESOL member, which you can do just by submitting a request to our webmaster.

All of our grants can be found on this page. And links to the applications can be found there, too. Here’s an outline what we have to offer:

Research or Development of Classroom Materials Grant
This award is designed to provide financial support for library materials, field research or the preparation of pedagogical activities. Grant Amount: Up to $500 per year for one applicant. Should you be selected, you will be expected to submit a proposal about your work to the following year’s fall conference.
Richard Yorkey Developmental Grant
This award was created in 1998 to honor and remember Dr. Richard Yorkey, a noted author and educator, who loyally and actively contributed to NNETESOL for many years. The grant provides financial support for professional development, such as a college course or training opportunity in the English as a Second Language (ESL) field. Training must be completed within one year of receiving the grant. Grant Amount: Up to $800.
Mainstream Teacher Grant
Northern New England TESOL would like to recognize the many mainstream classroom teachers who contribute to the academic success of English language learners (ELL) in their schools. Grant Amount: $100 gift certificate, letter of recognition sent to his/her principal, and free admittance for the nominator and nominee to a NNETESOL conference.
Graduate Student Grant
Established in 2013, this award is designed to recognize graduate students in TESOL related programs in member states that seek to enhance their knowledge about ESOL by attending the NNETESOL conference. Up to three individuals may receive the award each year, one from each member state. Grant Amount: Complimentary registration to the Northern New England TESOL conference in the same calendar year as the award and up to $50 travel reimbursement.
So, friends, what have you got to lose? We want to support, and we know it is often hard to come by…
Come join us!

 

Dear Teachers, Bloom This Summer

by NNETESOL Board Member, Stephanie N. Brownsun-flower-1556076__180

Dear Teachers, Instructors, Administrators, Authors, and Facilitators,

Congratulations on a successful semester and year. You deserve a round of applause, a vacation, and a hefty raise. You have worked hard this semester to help your students and your programs. You have bought lots coffee and stayed up late to grade papers and plan lessons. The successes in your classes and with your students are because of your hard work and dedication.

It is now summer, also know as teacher hibernation. With wishful thinking we hope this hibernation will be full of rest, sunshine, and sweet tea. In reality, a teacher’s hibernation is not always this relaxing. We use this time to catch-up and get-ahead. Often we are working side jobs, planning for the coming semester, and trying to balance our home and social life. With the long work and home to-do lists, I want to encourage you to bloom this summer. Make time for yourself (mind, body, and soul). Take the 15 minute break to walk your dog. Sleep in an extra 1hour. Go to trivia night with your friends. Be mindful of your need to relax and rejuvenate.

Teachers are overworked, and toward the end of the semester begin to wilt. It is important that over the summer we get our much needed water, sunshine, and rest. We need to focus our energy on ourselves, before we can give ourself to the classroom. This summer take the time to bloom again. Take the time to love your self, your life, and your world. Stretch your roots, your branches, and your petals.

Be well and bloom this summer,

Stephanie Brown

 

How to Become an Ambassador

Just saw this in our NNETESOL inbox: What a great opportunity!!TESOL2017

———————————–

TESOL is looking for individuals from all over the world to be ambassadors for the 2017 TESOL International Convention & English Language Expo.

TESOL will select up to six TESOL members to serve as Convention Ambassadors. As an ambassador, you will write about where you are in the world, why you are going to the 2017 convention, and what you hope to get out of it. TESOL will share your photo and your words with other TESOL professionals around the world to encourage them to attend the convention.

If you are selected, you will receive:

• US$50 off of their convention registration
• a US$50 convention food voucher
• recognition at the 2017 convention in Seattle

To be selected, you must meet the following criteria:

• You are attending the 2017 Convention in Seattle, Washington, USA.
• You are a TESOL member.
• You are willing to write an entry for the TESOL Blog.
• You will allow TESOL to use your photo and your writing to promote the 2017 convention.
• You are willing share your excitement about the convention on social media and in other ways.

To apply, please complete the online form by Monday, 15 August. If you are selected, you will be notified by 31 August.

Reminder: Electronic Village Online Call for Proposals

EVOLOGO2017Want to present at TESOL’s Electronic Village Online (EVO)? The Call for Proposals is open through 9/4/16!

Free money.

by Beth Evans, NNETESOL Board President-Elect

Free money.dollar-1362244_960_720

For teachers.

Really! I’m not kidding!

Happy waning days of summer, NNETESOLers! Now is the time that you need to start thinking about your hopes and dreams. As a member of the NNETESOL board, I’d like you to know that part of what you spend to come to our fall conference (which, by the way, is going to be in Gorham, Maine, this year) is going toward scholarships that support you.

We try very hard to keep our registration prices low and to bring in speakers with interesting ideas, who push you to think in new directions. We know that in our tri-state region, professional development may not be easy to come by. And we hope that by working together, we can learn from each other.

But we also want to support what you do every day. We understand how hard this job is, and we think you deserve some recognition.

So here’s what you need to know:

  • The deadline for all our grants is September 1. (And to be perfectly honest with you, we get very few applicants. The competition since I joined the board in 2006 has been weak at best. One, maybe two people apply each year for the grants. Sometimes we get none. We’d like to change that.)
  • You must live, work and/or study in the tri-state region we represent.
  • You must be an NNETESOL member, which you can do just by submitting a request to our webmaster.

All of our grants can be found on this page. And links to the applications can be found there, too. Here’s an outline what we have to offer:

Research or Development of Classroom Materials Grant 

This award is designed to provide financial support for library materials, field research or the preparation of pedagogical activities. Grant Amount: Up to $500 per year for one applicant. Should you be selected, you will be expected to submit a proposal about your work to the following year’s fall conference.

Richard Yorkey Developmental Grant

This award was created in 1998 to honor and remember Dr. Richard Yorkey, a noted author and educator, who loyally and actively contributed to NNETESOL for many years. The grant provides financial support for professional development, such as a college course or training opportunity in the English as a Second Language (ESL) field. Training must be completed within one year of receiving the grant. Grant Amount: Up to $800.

Mainstream Teacher Grant

Northern New England TESOL would like to recognize the many mainstream classroom teachers who contribute to the academic success of English language learners (ELL) in their schools. Grant Amount: $100 gift certificate, letter of recognition sent to his/her principal, and free admittance for the nominator and nominee to a NNETESOL conference.

Graduate Student Grant

Established in 2013, this award is designed to recognize graduate students in TESOL related programs in member states that seek to enhance their knowledge about ESOL by attending the NNETESOL conference. Up to three individuals may receive the award each year, one from each member state. Grant Amount: Complimentary registration to the Northern New England TESOL conference in the same calendar year as the award and up to $50 travel reimbursement.

So, friends, what have you got to lose? We want to support, and we know it is often hard to come by…

Come join us!

 

When the Student Becomes the Teacher

guitar-1180744__180By NNETESOL Board Member Heidi Western

The bell rang and the students filed out after what had been a rather mundane lesson on using comparative language to discuss the electromagnetic spectrum.  I sat at my desk intently making notes to better our next class. Mirkesh sidled up to my desk and with his characteristic grin and impish gestures pointed to the guitar case on a high shelf behind me and asked, “Mrs. Western, what is this?” It was not uncommon for him to stop by for a personal chat after class. One day last fall year he wouldn’t leave until I could sing an entire lullaby in Nepali.   He still greets me in the morning with the one line I managed to grasp, “Loi, Loi”.

I knew he knew it was a guitar. What I heard him asking instead was, “Why don’t you ever play that?” In a moment free of self-monitoring or forethought I replied, “It’s your guitar.” Mirkesh didn’t bat an eyelash as I brought it down from the shelf.  Years earlier I used this guitar to strum the tune of, “one little, two little, three little American Indians – to teach one of the Japanese counting systems to some other inquisitive language learners. I had borrowed the guitar from the closet in the World Language Department where I had noticed it sitting for the 6 years I had been teaching Japanese.  My supervisor was about to retire and said, “I would like you to have this guitar. A student who enlisted to fight in the Vietnam War asked me to hold it for him, and you see, it is still here.”

My mother gave me my first guitar when my second child was born. It was an Oscar Schmidt she bought at the church rummage sale.  Bob, the perpetual usher, also worked at the town dump and had rescued that instrument with a broken neck.  He glued it back on and voila, $5 later, I was knocking out “Hush Little Baby”. Yet my skill has not progressed much beyond the lullabies I learned to sing my own children to sleep.

The World Language guitar remained in my classroom ‘just-in-case’. I tried to use it a few times; the tuning had become impossible even after replacing the nylon strings. Meanwhile I had acquired a new-to-me Martin and my son and husband each have a guitar in our living room at home. Students who had tried to play the Vietnam-era classical became frustrated, as did I. So there it sat. A great story. And in fact before opening it I felt just a little guilty for gifting something less-than-desirable to an eager learner; I didn’t want to ultimately hinder his learning. I rationalized that maybe it would prompt him to go further, and if he was really going to play, that he would find another guitar.

I took the 6-string out of its case and tuned it up in a few seconds. That was unexpected. I strummed a few familiar cords on metal strings. Wow, oh no!  I felt a twinge in my stomach as the realization took hold. This was not the bequeathal from a wise and beloved administrator.  “Oscar Schmidt” inlaid in white cursive blinked like a billboard from the head by my left hand. This was my first ‘real’ guitar – the one I learned to play 22 years ago.  I don’t even remember when I switched out my classroom guitars – or where that other gut-box went. Mirkesh sensed my hesitation and continued admiring the instrument without any possessive demonstration. Now the ‘real’ decision was literally ‘on the table.’

I showed him a few cords and he played them back effortlessly. Decision made.  We agreed he would practice 10 minutes a day and name it ‘Oscar’. I watched them walk out to the bus stop together, new friends.

When I learned that Mirkesh’s mentor-tutor from SMC, the one he met by chance on the slopes the day before their first scheduled English lesson when Mirkesh decided he wanted to learn snowboarding but had not yet signed-up and got on the bus anyway, was going to become his guitar tutor, it played right into the score.

In a culmination of serendipity, last week while catching up on the chores at home during summer vacation I was vacuuming the living room and noticed a label in blue marker on the guitar at the base of the pile… ‘ROOM 101’ – my classroom. It was the classic from the World Language closet. I had probably brought it home for the summer last year or the one before thinking I had grabbed Oscar. Now I know why.

The most fulfilling moments as a teacher for me have been when something unplanned comes up in class – or out of class.  Getting to the end of a chapter or entering grades too often becomes the intention that blurs my vision. The bells and bustle of progress through the corridors and collegial complaints become the din that muffles my hearing. Sometimes we are lucky enough to be alerted by some great wind of generous spirit and are able to seize the moment, nurture its potential, and watch the expansion in students’ minds and hearts. In this moment the student becomes the teacher by showing me that the outcome, grammar or pronunciation, are not the only focus of our interactions. When we appreciate this as teachers we experience true bliss. That one moment, I managed to put aside the confines of daily cares and expectations to make room for a question from a student.  I managed to flow with the unrehearsed wisdom available to us all. Thank you Mirkesh, I am blessed.  ‘Loi Loi’.

 

Troubling Times and Connections to Immigrant and New American Communities

By NNETESOL President, Cynthia Reyes

On behalf of the NNETESOL organization, I am writing to acknowledge the tragic and deeply troubling events in Baton Rouge, St. Paul, and Dallas.  These events sadden all of us.  In addition to destroying lives, they undermine confidence in the strength building that we, as teachers, do on a daily basis, trying to foster hope for future generations, particularly for our immigrant and New American students. As I reflect on the different perspectives that seem to pour in from the news and the different ways that Black Lives Matter and the recent shooting of LGBTQ communities in Orlando seem to resonate as editorial writers point out commonalities in the way that hate is carried out across all groups, I am reminded of the immigrant and New American communities in our New England states and the deplorable ways that U.S. legacy on race and racism can also impact these communities. These stories can also hit close to home. Recently, Burlington’s 7 Days Newspaper published an article about a Somali Bantu woman, Fatuma Bulle, who was a victim of hate crime. It was a life-threatening encounter, but with the help of a bystander Bulle managed to get away from the man and was able to protect her 7-year-old son. Hoping to expose such hate crimes, Bulle has become an advocate for her community and speaks out against Islamophobia.

In a chapter on Migration and the Family Life Cycle, family therapy author Celia Falicov (2011) wrote about the ways that race in the U.S. could be an ecological stressor shaping the lives of immigrants, sometimes transforming them into the disadvantaged position of being members of a racial, cultural, socioeconomic, and citizenship minority that is often discriminated against.  Falicov described how even when some immigrants were people of color in their own country, they were not considered as “others” in terms of language and culture. She cited double consciousness as one form of resilient response by sharing a case study of an Oaxacan family that chose to absorb an injustice related to racism in order to move forward in securing the safety of the family.

W.E.B. DuBois first coined the phrase “double consciousness” in 1897 to refer to the ways in which African Americans were forced to view themselves through the racist eyes of their oppressors, including himself as he described it in his autobiography “The Souls of Black Folks.” It also referred to societal structures that denied them opportunities. Since then the concept of double consciousness has also been examined with a particular focus on feminism, as well as on immigrant youth. Leigh Patel’s ethnography (2013) “Youth Held at the Border” focuses on the case studies of a few undocumented youth attending high school who realize that they have hit a ceiling in higher education as their opportunities are fatefully intertwined with their citizen status. Patel describes the institutionalized racism that is sometimes inherent in school institutions. Although race is something that all of her adult and young participants know about and claim to challenge, she makes transparent some of the federal and local school policies and practices that nevertheless prove detrimental to youth as they work against incredible odds to complete their education and schooling in the U.S.. The teachers whom she interviews and who are aware of such structures are just as immobilized as the students when it comes to their future, sometimes helpless about what can be done; however, Patel describes a concept called the contact zone in which adults and youth can have these messy conversations about race, immigration, and society reaffirming what youth feel and experience as their lives. Such conversations about race can be powerful and scary.

I am reminded of a time many years ago when I was a bilingual Spanish/English teacher in a middle grades public school classroom in Chicago, IL. My students, who were mostly Mexican American and Mexican immigrant, were trying to figure out why I looked Asian but could speak fluent Spanish. It was unfamiliar to them in the same way that they found that some of their white teachers could also speak fluently in their language. Even then, my students and I were dealing with issues of race as a few of them experimented with some derogatory names for Asians, not realizing that those names could exact a similar kind of hurt that they themselves felt when they heard derogatory terms related to their identity status. Through storytelling and writing, and a little bravery on my part by jumping into the unknown, I began to dialogue with my students about these hurtful terms. I won’t say that our first conversation went smoothly, that students immediately felt empowered, or that I approached each incident with wise and powerful words, but it began to feel like we were undertaking something important by naming what we felt and experienced. It was a beginning. And, since then, I have continued to learn from these experiences about how to have more meaningful conversations about race, now with my older undergraduate students. Although occasional moments of ambivalence, confusion, and fear still take a hold of, and choke, some of our beginning conversations, knowing that we find the courage to return to those conversations and make things right creates a feeling of hope. And, it seems right when my students tell me that they feel heard or respected.

As our states continue to embrace New American communities, and as more families migrate from the Middle East, more teachers will once again mobilize to help their New American students develop a sense of belonging in their new schools. At the same time, the news and social media continue to be flooded with anti-immigrant sentiment and racial hatred. Hopefully, we can explore more deeply such concepts as double consciousness and the contact zone to reaffirm what some of our immigrant and New American students experience in the schools and to further enhance our cultural competency skills to deal with race and racism in the classroom. As a start, I share educational websites that are informative and instructive when it comes to engaging controversial and provocative topics in the classroom. It may be useful to dig into these websites to be better prepared to work in a multicultural and multilingual classroom. Also identifying a classroom teacher, curriculum coordinator, school multicultural liaison or staff member could be valuable in forging interdisciplinary relationships to address these topics. It will take all of our efforts to remain vigilant, to speak out against acts of injustice, and to raise our voices to denounce incidents of hate wherever we see it happen.

Rethinking Schools began as a local effort to address problems such as basal readers, standardized testing, and textbook-dominated curriculum. Since its founding, it has grown into a nationally prominent publisher of educational materials, with subscribers in all 50 states, all 10 Canadian provinces, and many other countries. While the scope and influence of Rethinking Schools has changed, its basic orientation has not. While writing for a broad audience, Rethinking Schools emphasizes problems facing urban schools, particularly issues of race, and addresses them through curriculum and lesson plans for grades K-12.

Southern Poverty Law Center Our Teaching Tolerance project combats prejudice among our nation’s youth while promoting equality, inclusiveness and equitable learning environments in the classroom. We produce an array of anti-bias resources that we distribute, free of charge, to K-12 educators across the country – award-winning classroom documentaries, lesson plans and curricula, Teaching Tolerance magazine, and more.

 

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